Long Island Regional Envirothon, Ltd.
423 Griffing Avenue • Riverhead, New York 11901 • 631-852-3287 • email

"Long Island's premier environmental studies program for high school students in Nassau and Suffolk Counties."


2018 Long Island Envirothon Brochure - Click Here...

20th Annual L.I. Envirothon
• Wednesday, April 25, 2018 •  Usdan Summer Camp for the Arts

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2018 CURRENT ISSUE

Station Master

TBA


 

 

"Western Rangeland Management: Balancing Diverse Views"

• Introduction

• Learning Objectives

  • References

Introduction

Western rangelands include prairies and grasslands, sagebrush steppes, and woodland areas.  Rangelands comprise more than 40% of the total productive land base in the western U.S.  Rangelands sustain an abundance of forage for both livestock and wildlife, as well as providing aesthetic beauty enjoyed by many.  Rangeland resources are a critically important ecosystem component of the western US  landscape and are a vital economic factor for many agricultural producers. 

Western rangeland management objectives include grazing, timber harvest, recreational uses (including hiking, camping, fishing, hunting, etc.) and mining.  Western rangelands are diverse and rich in natural resources and provide an essential fresh water source for all of the western U.S. Public land managers and agriculturalists work to protect these resources to ensure their sustainability for generations to come. 

Envirothon Teams will learn about the importance of western rangelands, and the need for balance in management planning.  Livestock producers are an important economic driver in the western US, sustainably utilizing the rangelands to maintain a living and produce a valued product. As good stewards of the land, most livestock producers work to protect natural resources, including sage grouse habitat and prevent catastrophic wildfire.  Differences of opinion on management strategies of western public rangelands have resulted in escalating friction between Non- Government Organizations  (NGO’s), political representatives, federal land managers, and permittees.  Disputes arising from this diversity of opinion often end up in the judicial system, through expensive and lengthy litigation.  This process does not lead to timely and effective land management decisions, nor does it foster good working relationships between stakeholders.  Federal land managers are placed in a difficult position, charged with consideration of multiple and often conflicting views, and are often seen as capitulating to one or other groups with extreme views. It is important that public rangelands be managed in consideration of all environmental, social and economic objectives, so as to provide the widest possible range of benefits.  A key factor in developing the best possible management strategy is honest and effective communication between stakeholders.  

Envirothon teams will learn how Best Management Practices are used to protect western rangelands, improve grazing management schemes, promote pest management, reduce uncontrolled wildfires, and improve habitat for sage grouse and other wildlife.  Information provided and site visits will demonstrate the importance of finding the optimum balance between natural resource protection and agricultural use on western public rangelands.

 

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Key Topics

  1. Grazing is a popular tool in western rangeland management. How can this tool be used to help manage the ecosystem?
  2. What can management strategies help to reduce the spread and impact of noxious weeds?
  3. How can western rangeland management have a positive impact on fire suppression, and how can the lack of management be a negative impact on fire suppression?
  4. How can western rangeland management be used to maintain a balanced plant community to support livestock, sage grouse, as well as other wildlife and land uses?
  5. How can rangeland managers balance livestock production (grazing) with the maintenance of water quality?
  6. How can stakeholders with different values and opinions improve communication and working relationships to develop improved rangeland management strategies?

 

Learning Objectives

 

Information and examples provided will help Envirothon Teams understand the following:

  1. Characteristics and location of rangeland in the Western United States and how it is currently managed.
  2. The percentage of land in the west that is federally controlled and allows multiple resource use.
  3. Ways to protect water quality within western rangeland management.
  4. How grazing is used as an effective management tool to control noxious weeds, reduce catastrophic wildfires, and improve wildlife habitat.
  5. The current Best Management Practices (BMPs) for western rangelands and how they support livestock production, pest management, fire suppression, and wildlife habitat maintenance.
  6. How different ecosystems (wetland, riparian, and upland areas) within the rangelands interact.
  7. How the use of the land by humans, domestic livestock, and wildlife affects the plant community.
  8. The rights of private landowners and citizens’ related to public land.

 

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References



 Western Rangeland Management 2018 Study Guide 

2018 "Core Topic" Idaho Study Guide

 

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The past Current Issue topics and Station Masters have been...

2018 Western Rangeland Management: 
Balancing Diverse Views
TBA
2017 Agricultural Soil & Water
Conservation Stewardship
USDA - Natural Resource Conservation Service - Liz Camps
2016 Invasive Species: A Challenge to the Environment, Economy and Society Suffolk County Soil & Water Conservation District - Polly Weigand
2015 Urban Forestry Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County - Robin L. Simmen Community Horticulture Specialist

2014

Sustainable Local Agriculture /Locally Grown

Agricultural Stewardship Program Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County - Becky Wiseman, Coordinator

2013

Sustainable Rangeland Management

Nassau County Soil & Water Conservation District - Dawn Alarcon

2012

Nonpoint Source Pollution/Low Impact Development

Nassau County Soil & Water Conservation District - Aldona Lawson

2011

Salt and Fresh Water Estuaries

Suffolk County Department of Health Services - Office of Ecology - Peconic Estuary Program - Kim Barbour

2010

Protection of Groundwater Through Urban, Agricultural and Environmental Planning

Suffolk County Department of Health Services - Office of Ecology - Peconic Estuary Program - Kim Paulsen

2009

Biodiversity in a Changing World

NY Sea Grant - Larissa Graham & Central Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission - Melissa Griffiths

2008

Recreational Impacts on Natural Resources

The Waterfront Center - Jeanne Beyer & James Europe

2007

Alternative/Renewable Energy

Citizen's Campaign for the Environment - Mary Ellen Dour & Maureen Dolan-Murphy

2006

Water Stewardship in a Changing Climate

Nassau County Soil & Water Conservation District - Sherry Forgash

2005

Managing Cultural Landscapes

Suffolk County Soil & Water Conservation District - Sharon Frost

2004

Natural Resource Management in the Urban Environment

 

2003

Farmland Preservation & Conservation

Suffolk County Soil & Water Conservation District - George Proios

2002

Introduced Species

 

2001

Urban Nonpoint Source Pollution

Suffolk County Soil & Water Conservation District - Sharon Frost

2000

Wetland Management

 

1999

Wildfire Management

 


2009 L.I. Envirothon
Old Bethpage Village Restoration



2008 L.I. Envirothon
Usdan Center of Creative and Performing Arts
Wheatley Heights, NY



2008 L.I. Envirothon
Usdan Center of Creative and Performing Arts
Wheatley Heights, NY



2008 L.I. Envirothon
Usdan Center of Creative and Performing Arts
Wheatley Heights, NY



2008 L.I. Envirothon
Usdan Center of Creative and Performing Arts
Wheatley Heights, NY



2008 L.I. Envirothon
Usdan Center of Creative and Performing Arts
Wheatley Heights, NY



2008 L.I. Envirothon
Usdan Center of Creative and Performing Arts
Wheatley Heights, NY


 

Long Island Regional Envirothon, Ltd. • 423 Griffing Avenue • Riverhead, New York 11901 • 631-852-3287 • email