Menfro -- Missouri State Soil

Photograph of a hilly landscape with a hay field in the foreground with round bales of hay.
    Woodland areas occur throughout the scene. A farmstead is in the midground of the photograph.

Photograph of the profile of a typifying pedon of Menfro soil series.

Menfro Soil Profile

Surface layer: dark brown silt loam
Subsurface layer: brown silt loam
Subsoil - upper: brown silt loam
Subsoil - lower: dark brown silty clay loam
Substratum: brown silt loam
Menfro soils are used for corn, soybeans, small grain, and forage crops and for specialty crops of tobacco, grapes, vegetables, and fruits. These soils are desirable building sites. Most of the steeper areas support deciduous hardwood timber. These soils occur on about 780,000 acres in Missouri.

The first State Capitol building in St. Charles, the present State Capitol building, and the Governor’s mansion were constructed on Menfro soils. The home of Daniel Boone and the first settlement west of the Mississippi River are in areas of Menfro soils. Hannibal, the home of Mark Twain, and Hermann, an historic German community, also are on Menfro soils.

small scale map of Missouri showing distribution of Menfro soil series.

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